There is a common belief that chronic pain is related to weather, but scientific evidence has been inconclusive. A new study (n=2,658) demonstrated significant yet modest relationships between pain and relative humidity, pressure and wind speed, even after accounting for mood and physical activity.


I’ve deliberately linked to the original source journal article that is open access and full-text.

The title of my post is a copy and paste from the abstract of the linked journal article here:

Patients with chronic pain commonly believe their pain is related to the weather. Scientific evidence to support their beliefs is inconclusive, in part due to difficulties in getting a large dataset of patients frequently recording their pain symptoms during a variety of weather conditions.

The analysis demonstrated significant yet modest relationships between pain and relative humidity, pressure and wind speed, with correlations remaining even when accounting for mood and physical activity.

Citation: How the weather affects the pain of citizen scientists using a smartphone app William G. Dixon, Anna L. Beukenhorst, Belay B. Yimer, Louise Cook, Antonio Gasparrini, Tal El-Hay, Bruce Hellman, Ben James, Ana M. Vicedo-Cabrera, Malcolm Maclure, Ricardo Silva, John Ainsworth, Huai Leng Pisaniello, Thomas House, Mark Lunt, Carolyn Gamble, Caroline Sanders, David M. Schultz, Jamie C. Sergeant & John McBeth npj Digital Medicine volume 2, Article number: 105 (2019) DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41746-019-0180-3



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